Grandfather’s Wisdom

On December 13, six days after the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, I joined several Dharma friends from the San Mateo Buddhist Temple for a one-time screening of actor and civil rights activist George Takei’s Broadway musical Allegiance at the Century Cinema in the Tanforan shopping center near San Francisco International Airport. The cinema sits on the former site of the Tanforan Racetrack in San Bruno, which was the assembly center where Japanese immigrants and U.S. citizens of Japanese ancestry living in the San Francisco Bay Area, including San Mateo, were housed in horse stables prior to being loaded onto trains with covered windows and transported to hastily constructed camps hundreds of miles to the east. In the end, 120,000 people were uprooted from their homes and communities following President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066, which authorized the forced evacuation of all persons of Japanese ancestry from the West Coast in the wake of the Pearl Harbor attack. Inspired by George Takei’s childhood experience of being interned at the Santa Anita Racetrack outside Los Angeles before being sent with his family to the Rowher Relocation Center in Arkansas, Allegiance tells the story of the Kimura family, who were farmers in Salinas before the outbreak of the Second World War.

The play details the turmoil experienced by the Kimura family as they are forced to sell their farm for a fraction of its value and relocate to the internment camp at Heart Mountain, Wyoming. Much of the story revolves around the relationship between two American-born Nisei siblings, Keiko and her younger brother Sam, and their Japanese-born Issei father Tatsuo. The play powerfully evokes the tremendous strain that the internment placed on families. In the Kimura family, we see conflicts erupting due to differing values across generations, as well as divisions among people of the same generation, coming to a head with the notorious loyalty questionnaire that asked internees to declare whether or not they were willing to declare loyalty to the United States, renounce allegiance to the Emperor of Japan, and serve the U.S. military in combat duty wherever ordered.

In an opening address to the audience watching Allegiance in theaters, George Takei reminded us that the racism and discrimination that led to the grave injustice of the internment camps are alarmingly visible in our society today. He also expressed the hope that by shedding light on this dark chapter in American history, we will be able to prevent such injustice from reoccurring in our country. Over the past month, several Sangha members have approached me expressing concern about recent hate crimes in our area, proposals for a national registry of Muslims and immigration policies that could disrupt the lives of countless families in our community. They have asked me, “What can we do as Buddhists to make a difference in these turbulent times?”

I share their concern, and found myself pondering this question as I reflected on the story told in Allegiance–a story that echoes the lived experiences of so many of my friends and teachers in the Nembutsu. The character of Ojii-chan, Keiko and Sam’s grandfather played by George Takei, was a beacon of calm, humor and wisdom in the midst of the injustice of internment camp life and the tensions triggered by the loyalty questionnaire. I came away with the strong impression that the character of Ojii-chan was Mr. Takei’s tribute to the Issei elders who sustained the Japanese-American community with their strength and dignity during those troubled years. Ojii-chan does not show anger or resentment, but he is not passive. At key moments in the story, he shines the light of wisdom on difficult decisions faced by Keiko and Sam, helping them to see the clear path forward. After thoughtful conversations with Ojii-chan, both Keiko and Sam are inspired to take courageous action to oppose injustice.

My own life in the Nembutsu is deeply inspired by the families of our Sangha who lived through the events depicted in Allegiance. Each day I spend at the San Mateo Buddhist Temple I am humbled to be a recipient of the legacy of their lives that shine with the wisdom and compassion of the Buddha here in America. The elders of the San Mateo Buddhist Temple are my true Dharma teachers. I believe that their lives show us that when, in the midst of adversity, one maintains a clear and calm mind illuminated by the Buddha’s wisdom, simple conversations and everyday activities like tending a garden can inspire change and transform the world we live in. With palms joined in gassho, I bow my head in gratitude to those whose lives shined with the light of the Buddha’s wisdom during those dark years of war. Through their strength and dignity they embodied the truth that we find in the Sutra on the Buddha of Immeasurable Life:

Even if the whole world were filled with fire,
Resolutely pass through it in your quest to hear the Dharma.
You will unfailingly attain the enlightenment of Buddha
And bring beings everywhere across the stream of birth-and‐death.

(The Three Pure Land Sutras, Volume II: The Larger Sutra, Part II)

 

Namo Amida Butsu


おじいちゃんの智慧

12月13日にサンマテオ仏教会のご門徒さん数人と一緒に俳優のジョージ・タケイ氏が公演したミュージカル『忠誠/ALLEGIANCE』の特別上映を見に行きました。サンフランシスコ国際空港の近くにあるタンフォランショッピングセンターにある映画館で見ましたが、その映画が建てられている土地は以前にタンフォラン競馬場であって、真珠湾攻撃の後にサンマテオを含めてサンフランシスコ周辺に住んでいた日系人はその競馬場に集合するように命令され、そこから東に何百マイルも離れている強制収容所の準備が完了するまではしばらくそこの馬屋にて生活させられていました。フランクリン・デラーノ・ルーズベルト大統領が大統領令9066号をサインしたことによって、その時、西海岸各地在住の日系人120、000人が、住んでいた家やコミュニティーを離れて強制的に収容所に移動させられました。

『忠誠/ALLEGIANCE』はジョージ・タケイ氏が子供の時にロスアンゼルスの近くにあるサンタアニタ競馬場にあった集合センターから、アルカンソー州にあったローワー移住センターに収容された経験に基づいた映画で、主人公はサリナスで農業をしていたキムラという家族です。ワイオミング州のハードマウンテンにあった収容所に移動する前、キムラ家は殆どの財産を処分しないといけなかったので、農場を本当の価値の一部で売るしかなかったです。アメリカで生まれた二世のケイコとその弟のサム、そして日本生まれの一世のお父さんタツオの家族関係がその物語の中心となっています。キムラ家の中で、異なる世代間の価値観の違いも同世代間の人の考え方の違いも見られます。対立の主な原因は収容所にて行われた忠誠心調査で、質問27:「貴方は命令を受けたら、如何なる地域であれ合衆国軍隊の戦闘任務に服しますか?」と「質問28:貴方は合衆国に忠誠を誓い、国内外における如何なる攻撃に対しても合衆国を忠実に守り、且つ日本国天皇、外国政府・団体への忠節・従順を誓って否定しますか?」が一番争いを招くもとになりました。

物語が始まる前に上映されたメッセージに、ジョージ・タケイ氏が日系人強制収容を取り巻いていた人種差別や偏見が現在のアメリカ社会によく現れています。タケイ氏がその当時の日系人強制収容の暗い歴史を明らかにすることによって、同じことが再び行われない念願を示しました。最近ベイエリアで起こった憎悪犯罪、提案されているイスラム教徒の全国登録制度や家族を離散しうる移民政策を心配するご門徒さんの何人かは私を訪ねてきて、「この状態を改善するために私が仏教徒としてできることは何でしょうか?」と聞かれました。

アメリカ社会の現状は私も心配しており、『忠誠/ALLEGIANCE』を見ながら、私がその歴史を経験なさっている方々との出会いを考えさせられました。ジョージ・タケイ氏が役したケイコとサムのおじいちゃんは収容場の厳しい生活や忠誠心調査が招いた対立の中でも冷静とユーモアを保ち、智慧の言葉を説かれます。そのおじいちゃんの人柄やあり方こそ、タケイ氏が一世の方々への尊敬と感謝を込めている部分であると私には強く感じられました。おじいちゃんは怒りや恨みを表に表しませんが、行動力がありました。ケイコもサムもおじいちゃんに相談することによって、自分の不正に立ち向かう道を明らかにすることができました。

『忠誠/ALLEGIANCE』に描かれている時代を生き抜かれた方々との出会いは、私のお念仏の生活の大きな導きとなっています。サンマテオ仏教会で過ごす日々の中で、その方々が生きた仏様の智慧の光で輝く人生を学ぶことができ、感謝の気持ちがわいてきます。サンマテオ仏教会の長老の方々は私の尊敬する善知識です。その方々の人生を尋ねますと、どんな大変な時でも阿弥陀如来の信心があれば、日頃の何気ない会話や庭仕事のような単純なことによって、ある人の人生の決断やその先の世界を大きく変えることもありうるのです。戦時の暗い時代に、仏様の光が輝く人生を送られていた方々に感謝の合掌をします。その方々のお陰でお念仏がいまもサンマテオに響いています。『仏説無量寿経』に説かれているように

たとえ世界中が火の海になったとしても、ひるまずすすみ、教えを聞くがよい。

そうすれば必ず仏のさとりを完成して、ひろく迷いの人々を救うであろう。

(浄土三部経 現代語訳 83頁)

 

南無阿弥陀仏