Seven Steps

We welcome you to join us at the San Mateo Buddhist Temple on Sunday, April 9, 2017, at 9:30 a.m. for our Hanamatsuri Service, the “Festival of Flowers” where we celebrate the birth of Sakyamuni Buddha in present-day Nepal about 2,500 years ago.

The Buddhacarita, a traditional biography of the Buddha, tells us that his mother Queen Maya longed to retreat from the chaos of the world to live a life of peaceful contemplation: “In her weariness she railed at the commonplace and longed to stay in a secluded forest, in the excellent garden of Lumbinī, where springs flowed and flowers and fruits were luxuriant. She wanted to meditate in quietude and beseeched the king for permission to travel there. The king understood her earnest wish and thought that it was wonderful.”

We are told that while delighting in the beauty and serenity of the of the gardens, Queen Maya gave birth to the child who would grow up to become the Buddha. The Buddhacarita, describes his moment of birth in the following verses:

Upright and clear of mind, he walked seven steps with dignity. On the bottom of his feet his level soles were well placed. His brightness was as penetrating as the seven stars.

Stepping like a lion, king of the animals, he observed the four directions. With thorough insight into the meaning of the truth, he thus spoke with the fullest assurance:

“As this birth is a buddha’s birth, it is my last birth. Just in this one birth I shall save all!”

(Buddhacarita: In Praise of the Buddha’s Acts, translated by Charles Willemen, pg. 4)

The seven steps taken at the time of his birth represent the Buddha’s intention to transcend the six paths of rebirth and realize final liberation from the chains of birth and death.

Buddhist teachings reflect a traditional Indian worldview that describes six paths of birth-and-death, or samsara, through which sentient beings continuously cycle lifetime after lifetime. These six paths of existence also provide insight into the way our thoughts and feelings change moment to moment. Below is a brief summary of the six paths described by the Genshin (942-1017) in the Essentials for Birth (Ojo Yoshu):

Hells

The hells are paths of uninterrupted physical and emotional torment. In Buddhism, a hell is not a place to which a person is permanently doomed according to the judgment of a divine being. Rather, hell is the unhappiness that results from hateful and violent living. As with all six paths, life in a hell path is not permanent and will eventually give way to birth in another path.

Hungry ghosts

Hungry ghosts have insatiable appetites, but any food or beverage they try to enjoy bursts into flames the moment it touches their lips. Birth as a hungry ghost occurs as the result of greed, as in a case where a person receives something good but fails to appreciate it because they want something even better.

Animals

To dwell in the animal path is to be shameless, unconcerned with the results of one’s foolish behavior. Some animals live as predators and prey in the wild; others are subjected to lives of servitude and grueling labor. One who dwells in the animal path is ruled by fear of punishment and the desire to be rewarded. Birth as an animal occurs when foolishness and ignorance rule one’s mind.

Asuras (Fighting Titans)

Asuras are constantly competing, envious of those who appear to have better things than they do, especially the devas. Life among asuras is divided into winners and losers, and they suffer from the terror of being surrounded by enemies and the wounds of battle.

Humans

Genshin describes three characteristics of human life: 1) Impurity: the human body is subject to disease and decay in all its parts, 2) Suffering: human life is characterized by suffering, and 3) Impermanence: all human life comes to an end. Nevertheless, human birth is most favorable among the six paths because it is an ideal circumstance for hearing the Dharma and breaking free from the cycle of death and rebirth.

Devas (Heavenly beings)

Devas lead lives of power, pleasure, and satisfied desire. However, at the end of their lives, devas experience the same suffering of separation and death shared by all beings in the six paths. As their death approaches, devas find themselves rejected by their companions who turn blind to their suffering, cast out of their heavenly palaces to die alone. Following death as a deva, any manner of rebirth may occur, even into the lowest hell of uninterrupted misery.

Prior to his birth in Lumbini, Sakyamuni passed through all these paths over the course of countless lives. That is why his teachings speak directly and clearly to our experiences. In the words of Shinran Shonin:

Sakyamuni Tathagata appeared in this world
Solely to teach the ocean-like Primal Vow of Amida;
We, an ocean of beings in an evil age of five defilements,
Should entrust ourselves to the Tathagata’s words of truth.

(Collected Works of Shinran, p. 70)

As we celebrate the appearance of our true teacher Sakyamuni Buddha in this world, let us continually turn our minds to the Nembutsu of the Primal Vow, so that we may follow in his footsteps, and cease our confused wandering through the six paths of birth-and-death.

 

Namo Amida Butsu


七歩

毎年春に世界中の仏教徒が、約2500年前インド北部に生きておられた釈迦牟尼仏陀の誕生を祝う法要を行います。日本の仏教では、4月8日が釈尊誕生の日とされ、その日に「花祭」という行事が行われ、これは釈尊誕生の際に、たくさんの花々が一斉に開花していた様子に基づいて行われています。サンマテオ仏教会では4月9日(日曜日)の9時半から「花祭」法要を行います。皆さま、是非ご一緒にお参りください。

夫人は種々の苦悩憂患なく、怒り、悲しみ、奢り、偽はりの心を生ずることなく、ひたすら、悪みと、諍いと、喧騒の巻を厭ひ空閑の林に遊ばんことを楽っていられた。(p. 18)

釈尊は生まれて直ぐに七歩歩まれ、その足跡には蓮の花が七つ咲いたと伝えられています。この七歩歩まれたというのは、生死の六道を乗り越える意志を表すと言われています。そして釈尊はそのとき、右手で天上を指し、次のように言いました。

『我れはこれ仏となるために生れたのである。この生涯は我が人間としての最後の生である。我れはもう他の存在を受くることなく、我れはすべての中に於て最も偉大なるものとなつて、、広く一世の生類を救済するであらう。』

仏所行讃 : 現代意訳, 池田卓然 訳著, p. 20

仏教の教えでは伝統的なインドの考え方を受けて、すべての生きているものは六道という六つの世界のいずれかに生まれ、そして死んではまた別の世界に生まれ変わることを繰り返すと言われています。この生死の六道を学ぶことによって、その時々で変化する私たちの日ごろの心を理解することができます。源信和尚(942~1017)は『往生要集』という論書の中で六道について次のように述べています。

地獄

衆生は次の八つの地獄に生まれることがある:1)等活地獄(何回も同じ苦しみが続く)、2)黒縄地獄、3)衆合地獄(鉄山が両方からせまって砕ける)、4)叫喚地獄、5)大叫喚地獄、6)、焦熱地獄、7)大焦熱地獄、8)無間地獄(絶え間なく苦しみを受け続ける)。仏教の地獄は神罰によって、永遠に苦しむところではなく、地獄に生まれるということは本人が恨んだり、傷つけたりする生き方に対して生じる報いのことです。他の五道と同じように、地獄に生まれてもそれは永遠に続くのではなく、いずれ死があり、次の転生があります。

餓鬼道

餓鬼は飽くことのない欲望(特に食欲と渇き)をもっていますが、食べ物や飲み物が唇に触れる瞬間に、それらが火となり口を火傷してしまうために常に飢えに苦しんでいます。餓鬼の様子は腹が丸く膨れていて、とても狭い首をしている姿で描かれていることが多く、人間と天の世界にも現れわれことがあります。餓鬼に生まれることは欲張りの報いであります。例えば、何か良いものをもらったにも関わらず、もっと良いものが欲しかったとそれに満足せず有難く思わないのは餓鬼の苦しみと言えるでしょう。

畜生道

畜生というのは動物のことを示し、畜生道に生まれたものは恥を知らず、自分の愚かな生き方を気にしません。また、常に罰を恐れながら、ご褒美ばかりを求めるのは畜生の生き方です。野生の畜生は殺し、殺される生涯で、人に飼われている畜生は一生涯きつい労働に使われます。畜生に生まれることは無明(煩悩にとらわれた迷い、愚かさと無知)に対する報いなのです。

阿修羅道

阿修羅は常に自分よりいいものをもっている相手(特に天)をうらやましがって、競争します。阿修羅の世界は勝つものと負けるものにはっきり分かれており、敵に囲まれることや戦いによる傷害が苦しみとなります。阿修羅は仏のみ教えを聞くことができるものの、相手に勝つことに一生懸命になるあまり、布施と慈悲のこころを忘れることが多いのです。

人道

源信和尚は人間の根本的な様子として次の三つを述べています:1)不浄:人間の体のすべての部分は病気に罹かったり、衰退していきます、2)苦:人生の中で皆必ず苦しみに遭遇します、3)無常:人間は皆いずれ死に逝きます。しかし、六道の中で、人間として生まれることは仏法を聞き悟りを得るための最も優れた機会なのです。礼讃文に「人身受けがたし、今すでに受く。仏法聞きがたし、今すでに聞く。この身今生にむかって度せんば、さらにいずれの生にむかってかこの身を度せん。」とあるように、人間としての生まれは貴重なものなので、他の人の命を救うように努めたり、他の人から自分の人生に必要なものをいただいたり、学び取れるように努力しなければなりません。

天道

天は力を持っており、楽しさ、欲望が満たされた生き方をします。但し、天も他の五道と同じように、いずれ死の別れの苦しみがあります。天道はあくまでも楽しむことが中心であるため、自分の死が近づくと、仲間からはずされ、楽しい宮から追い出され、孤独に死んでいきます。また、天が死ぬと、次に六道のどこに生まれるのか分からず、最も悪いところの無間地獄に生まれる可能性もあります。

人間としての生まれることは無常であり、いつ終わる のかは知ることができません。この人間としての生まれが終われば、他の五道に転生することが可能です。実際のところ、私たちは今までに数え切れないほど生まれ変わり、死に変わりを繰り返し、幾度となくすべての 六道を通ってきているのです。仏教における目標は常に人道にいるのではなく、すべての衆生(生きとし生けるもの)と共に生死から開放されること意味します。仏になることは生死から解放される道を悟り、すべての迷えるものを悟りに導くということなのです。『歎異抄』第五章にて親鸞聖人は六道のすべての衆生の救いについて次のように述べています:「命のあるものはすべてみな、これまで何度となく生まれ変わり死に変わりしてきた中で、父母であり兄弟・姉妹であったのです。この世の命を終え、浄土に往生してただ ちに仏となり、どの人をもみな救わなければならないのです。」(『浄土真宗聖典 歎異抄 現代語訳』

南無阿弥陀仏