Momotaro (Peach Boy) Story and Dharma Talk

On Sunday, June 28, 2020, we were delighted to welcome Mary Jo Kubota Sensei from our SMBT Summer Terakoya teaching team to share a traditional kamishibai telling of story of Momotaro, the Adventures of Peach Boy in English during our Zoom Dharma Service.  Rev. Henry’s Dharma Talk highlighted the Buddhist themes in this beloved children’s tale of Japan.

Live Each Day to Its Fullest

We reflect upon what it has meant for us to “live each day to its fullest / Like the Buddha who tirelessly works to liberate all” as we come to the end of this extraordinary school year.
Realizing the gift of life I have received
I shall strive to live each day to its fullest
Like the Buddha who tirelessly works to liberate all.

The Gift of Life

Rev. Adams shares reflections on his early childhood as the son of a police officer in the Minneapolis metro area,  as we consider our present moment and what it means for us to “realize the gift of life we have received” inspired by the words of Our Pledge:
Realizing the gift of life I have received
I shall strive to live each day to its fullest
Like the Buddha who tirelessly works to liberate all. 

Shared Ancestors

As summer vacation draws to a close we prepare to welcome the Autumn Equinox with our Ohigan Service on Sunday, September 23. Looking back on the lively season of temple activities that we enjoy between our bazaar in late June and our Obon in mid-August, I fondly recall the week of our Summer Terakoya Buddhist summer camp, when the sound of joyful children’s voices could be heard all day long at the temple.

This year our theme for Terakoya was Buddhist Holidays from around the world that commemorate important events in the life of Sakyamuni Buddha.
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Cicadas

As summer draws to an end and we prepare to welcome the change of seasons with our Autumn Ohigan service on September 24 at 9:30 a.m., I have been enjoying the following haiku by the Japanese poet Issa (1763-1827) that captures the atmosphere of our temple in recent weeks:

Kobōzu ya
tamoto no naka no
semi no koe.

Little monk, I hear the cicada in the sleeve of your robe.

Buddhist Temples have long played an important role in children’s education in Japan. Today many temples run preschools and kindergartens that are attended by local children. In Issa’s day, it was not uncommon for children whose families were not able to provide for them to be placed in the care of a Buddhist temple
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